WRITING & CORRECTION  

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Writing and Correction

Subcategories

  • BALLPOINT PENS

    Ballpoint Pens - a pen that has a small metal ball as the point of transfer of ink to paper. Roller ball pens are pens which use ball point writing mechanisms with water-based liquid or gelled ink, as opposed to the oil-based viscous inks found in ballpoint pens.

  • BALLPOINT & ROLLERBALL...

    Ballpoint refills allow for the entire internal ink reservoir, including a ball-point and socket, to be replaced.

  • CORRECTION FLUID

    correction fluid is an opaque, white fluid applied to paper to mask errors in text. Once dried, it can be written over. It is typically packaged in small bottles, and the lid has an attached brush (or a triangular piece of foam) which dips into the bottle. The brush is used to apply the fluid onto the paper.

  • CORRECTION PEN

    A correction fluid is an opaque, white fluid applied to paper to mask errors in text. Once dried, it can be written over. the correction fluid is packaged in a pen to allow for precise corrections. 

  • CORRECTION TAPE

    Correction tape is an alternative to correction fluid used to correct mistakes during typing, or, in some forms, handwriting. One side of the tape, which is placed against the error, is coated in a white, opaque masking material. Pressure applied to the other side of the tape transfers this material to the paper.

    Correction tape in its current form was invented by Japanese stationery product manufacturer Seed in 1989 and quickly spread throughout the world.

  • ROLLERBALL

    Roller ball pens are pens which use ball point writing mechanisms with water-based liquid or gelled ink, as opposed to the oil-based viscous inks found in ballpoint pens.

  • CRAYONS WAX

    A crayon (or wax pastel) is a stick of colored wax, charcoal, chalk or other material. A crayon made of oiled chalk is called an oil pastel; when made of pigment with a dry binder, it is simply a pastel. A grease pencil or china marker (UK chinagraph pencil) is made of colored hardened grease. There are also watercolor crayons, sometimes called watersoluble crayons. Crayons, which are available at a range of price points, are easy to work with, often less messy than paints and markers, blunt (removing the risk of sharp points present when using a pencil or pen), usually non-toxic, and are available in a wide variety of colors. These characteristics make them particularly good instruments for teaching small children to draw in addition to being used widely by student and professional artists.

  • HIGHLIGHTERS

    A highlighter is a type of pen used to draw attention to sections of text by marking them with a vivid, translucent colour. A typical highlighter is fluorescent yellow, coloured with pyranine. The first highlighter was introduced in 1963 by Carter's Ink Company, using the trademarked name Hi-Liter.

  • MARKERS

    Markers

  • PENCILS

    A pencil (pɛnsəl) is a writing implement or art medium usually constructed of a narrow, solid pigment core inside a protective casing. The case prevents the core from breaking, and also from marking the user’s hand during use. Pencils create marks via physical abrasion, leaving behind a trail of solid core material that adheres to a sheet of paper or other surface. They are noticeably distinct from pens, which dispense liquid or gel ink that stain the light colour of the paper. Writing can usually be removed with an eraser, but it is resistant to moisture, most chemicals, ultraviolet radiation and natural aging

  • PENCILS MECHANICAL

    A mechanical pencil (US English) or a propelling pencil (UK English) is a pencil with a replaceable and mechanically extendable solid pigment core called a lead. The lead is not bonded to the outer casing and can be extended as its point is worn away. The lead is often made of graphite or a solid pigment. Mechanical pencils are used to provide lines of constant thickness without sharpening in technical drawing and writing. They have also been used for fine-art drawing. Mechanical pencils were first used in the 18th century with many designs patented in the 19th and 20th centuries.

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